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Saturday, August 22, 2015

Learning Chaos

I was going to title this post, Learning Hierarchy, but that doesn't work since learning isn't a hierarchy. Then I was going to name it learning dodecahedron, but that was too symmetrical, orderly, and limited with regard to learning. After that, I thought about learning fractal, but again there was too much predictability in that model. I then looked up non-fractal and came up with the best metaphor I could find which is learning chaos.

The definition of Chaos Theory from this reference is "Chaos is the science of surprises, of the nonlinear and the unpredictable. It teaches us to expect the unexpected. While most traditional science deals with supposedly predictable phenomena like gravity, electricity, or chemical reactions, Chaos Theory deals with nonlinear things that are effectively impossible to predict or control, like turbulence, weather, the stock market, our brain states, and so on."

I came upon this thread of thought today as Ira Socal +Ira David Socol and +Gary Gruber challenged my thinking this morning. My first thought was that Ira and Gary top me when it comes to the learning hierarchy--they make me stretch with good questions, references, and ideas. I really like that, and reach for their perspective. But then when I started to think about learning in the broader sense, I realized that I am stretched in multiple ways by multiple people, and the important factor in all of this is to continue to consider your multiple paths towards your vision and the vision of others--the "relational truth" that I've been referring back to ever since I read Shapiro's Forbes article.

Since my path towards this thought is somewhat non traditional, and the language I use and the ways I think are sometimes unfamiliar to others,  I must say that I enjoy this journey of thought and learning, and continue to look for ways to navigate the chaos that is learning for me and for the many students I teach.

I welcome your thoughts on this topic. Let me know what you think?


Afterward
Ira Socol sent me this great picture and words in response to this post: